Don’t be the 1 in 7…

1 in 7 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime. Here’s what you can to avoid being a statistic.

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Count six of your friends. Or six other guys you know. Could be family, could be people you work with…you get the idea.

1 in 7 of those men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime.

So what’s a guy to do?

Early detection is a good start. The American Cancer Society has recommendations for early detection:

  • Age 50 for men who are at average risk of prostate cancer and are expected to live at least 10 more years.
  • Age 45 for men at high risk of developing prostate cancer. This includes African-Americans and men who have a first-degree relative (father, brother, or son) diagnosed with prostate cancer at an early age (younger than age 65).
  • Age 40 for men at even higher risk (those with more than one first-degree relative who had prostate cancer at an early age).

Of course, the ACS also says “the decision should be made after getting information about the uncertainties, risks, and potential benefits of prostate cancer screening and men shouldn’t be screened unless they have received this information.

But if you’re in those groups, you should think about getting tested. And these days you don’t even need to hassle with insurance, make any co-pays, or even go to the doctor to get a test. Companies will send you a test kit right to your door.

Statistics say about 1 guy out of every 39 will die of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death in American men. Those are the numbers. So, take care of yourself. Early detection saves lives. Don’t be a statistic.

 

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